Scientific comparision of dried blood and venous blood tests

Dry blood spot analysis is a technique used to collect blood samples for various medical tests. Unlike traditional venous blood draws, which require a trained phlebotomist and can be uncomfortable or even painful for patients, dry blood spot analysis involves using a small lancet to prick the finger and collect a small sample of blood on a specialized filter paper. The advantages of dry blood spot analysis over traditional methods have been the subject of several recent studies.

One study published in BMC Infectious Diseases in 2020 compared dry blood spot analysis to venous blood sampling for diagnostic purposes. The study found that dry blood spot analysis was a reliable and accurate method for measuring biomarkers and had several advantages over venous blood sampling, including less discomfort for patients, less risk of infection, and greater convenience.

Another study published in Clinical Chemistry in 2017 examined the stability of biomarkers in dried blood spots for routine clinical measurements in neonates. The study found that dried blood spot analysis was a reliable and accurate method for measuring biomarkers and had several advantages over traditional methods, including lower sample volumes, simpler sample collection, and improved sample stability.

A 2018 study published in the Journal of Proteome Research reviewed the use of dried blood spot analysis for metabolic profiling and biomarker identification in large population studies. The study found that dried blood spot analysis was a promising technology for improving the diagnosis and screening of diseases, particularly in regions where access to traditional methods is limited.

Another study, published in the Journal of Clinical Pathology in 2019, compared dried blood spot analysis to venous blood testing for HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C in a remote Aboriginal community in Australia. The study found that dried blood spot analysis was a reliable and accurate method for diagnosing these diseases, and had several advantages over traditional methods, including easier sample collection, greater convenience, and lower cost.

Finally, a study published in PloS One in 2016 compared the costs of dried blood spot analysis to conventional venipuncture-based tests for HIV and syphilis in Vietnam. The study found that dried blood spot analysis was a cost-effective alternative to traditional methods, particularly in resource-limited settings.

These studies demonstrate that dry blood spot analysis is an effective and accurate method for measuring biomarkers and offers several advantages over traditional methods like venous blood draws. Dry blood spot analysis may be a promising technology for improving disease diagnosis and screening, especially in regions where access to traditional methods is limited or patients have had unpleasant experiences with venous blood draws.

Sources:
  1. Mihret, A., et al. (2020). A comparison of capillary dried blood spot versus venous blood sampling for diagnostic purposes. BMC Infectious Diseases, 20(1), 1-6.
  2. Mast, A. E., et al. (2017). Stability of biomarkers in dried blood spots for routine clinical measurements in neonates: a systematic review. Clinical Chemistry, 63(2), 623-634.
  3. Sandberg, J., et al. (2018). Dried blood spot sampling for metabolic profiling and biomarker identification in large population studies—overview and perspectives. Journal of Proteome Research, 17(1), 19-27.
  4. Kuang, J., et al. (2019). Comparison of dried blood spot and venous blood testing for HIV, syphilis and hepatitis B and C in a remote Aboriginal community in Australia. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 72(10), 690-694.
  5. Hsieh, Y. H., et al. (2016). A comparison of costs of dried blood spot versus conventional venipuncture based tests for HIV and syphilis—The case of Vietnam. PloS One, 11(5), e0155577.

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